Aug 22nd, 2008 // 9 Comments

200px-BjorkVespertine.jpeg.jpgBjork offers journalists a lesson on the differences between engineering, programming, writing, and producing electronic music, in hopes that people will quit giving the wrong musicians credit when they’re talking about Vespertine and start double-checking the credit sheets if they’re thinking about praising specific people for specific recording tasks. [bjork.com via offnotesnotes]

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  1. Al Shipley

    That was a good read! It’d be nice to have more standardized definitions of different roles in modern recording; what gets called “producing” in one genre might mean strictly engineering, while in another it means composing and programming/performing. And sometimes the liner notes are so ambiguous that you can’t tell the difference even if you read them.

  2. Dead Air ummm Dead Air

    @Al Shipley: Of course, reading liner notes necisiates you bought the physcial product…

    Kinda easy to make up titles when no one is double checking.

  3. Al Shipley

    @Dead Air ummm Dead Air: Ehh, with Wikipedia and such it’s never been easier to find credits for albums online, provided they’re not super obscure, and nowadays a lot of legal (and some illegal) album downloads come with a digital booklet attached.

  4. theminx

    Dear Bjork,

    I think you’re great etc. and totally take your point, but it’s pitchforkmedia.com, not pitchfork.com.

    Yours truly,

    A Fan

  5. Maura Johnston

    @theminx: actually they bought pitchfork.com a while ago, although it seems to be having problems loading right now…

  6. theminx

    Ah. My RSS feed is old school, man.

  7. marc h.

    not disagreeing with bjork’s bigger points here, but the reason i posted this on my tumblr was that i noticed apparent factual errors based on assumptions in her post telling people not to make factual errors based on assumptions.

    pot, kettle, ass out of u and me, etc. etc.

  8. Maura Johnston

    @marc h.: oh, i know. but i did think that the point about writers (including me!) needing to learn more about the process behind music was a salient one, and one that’s especially lost in the era of the downloadable, liner-noteless ‘promo.’ (cough cough.)

  9. Anonymous

    @Maura Johnston: Props to you for acknowledging that most writers don’t know shit.

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